Philippi, Corinth, Macedonia, Greece, Troas

We set sail from Troas and took a straight course to Samothrace, the following day to Neapolis, and from there to Philippi, which is a leading city of the district of Macedonia and a Roman colony. We remained in this city for some days. On the sabbath day we went outside the gate by the river, where we supposed there was a place of prayer; and we sat down and spoke to the women who had gathered there. A certain woman named Lydia, a worshipper of God, was listening to us; she was from the city of Thyatira and a dealer in purple cloth. The Lord opened her heart to listen eagerly to what was said by Paul. When she and her household were baptized, she urged us, saying, ‘If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come and stay at my home.’ And she prevailed upon us. Acts 16:11-15

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Marie Ellenrieder, Baptism of Lydia, 1861. Berlin: Alte Nationalgalerie

After this Paul left Athens and went to Corinth. There he found a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, who had recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had ordered all Jews to leave Rome. Paul went to see them, and, because he was of the same trade, he stayed with them, and they worked together—by trade they were tentmakers. After staying there for a considerable time, Paul said farewell to the believers and sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. Acts 18:1-3,18

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St. Paul at Corinth with Aquila and Priscilla. Engraving by Jan Sadeler after Joos van Winghe, c.
1600. British Museum / Boijmans drawing, print / Wellcome / Wellesley

But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews made a united attack on Paul and brought him before the tribunal. They said, ‘This man is persuading people to worship God in ways that are contrary to the law.’Just as Paul was about to speak, Gallio said to the Jews, ‘If it were a matter of crime or serious villainy, I would be justified in accepting the complaint of you Jews; but since it is a matter of questions about words and names and your own law, see to it yourselves; I do not wish to be a judge of these matters.’ And he dismissed them from the tribunal. Then all of them seized Sosthenes, the official of the synagogue, and beat him in front of the tribunal. But Gallio paid no attention to any of these things. Acts 18:12-17

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Epaphroditus, Sosthenes, Apollos, Cephas and Caesar. Russian, 15th century.

Now after these things had been accomplished, Paul resolved in the Spirit to go through Macedonia and Achaia, and then to go on to Jerusalem. He said, ‘After I have gone there, I must also see Rome.’ So he sent two of his helpers, Timothy and Erastus, to Macedonia, while he himself stayed for some time longer in Asia. Acts 19:21-22

Erastus,_Olympus,_Rhodion,_Sosipater,_Quartus_and_Tertius_(Menologion_of_Basil_II).jpg
Erastus, Olympus, Rhodion, Sosipater, Quartus and Tertius. Menologion of Basil II, 985. Vatican

After the uproar had ceased, Paul sent for the disciples; and after encouraging them and saying farewell, he left for Macedonia. When he had gone through those regions and had given the believers much encouragement, he came to Greece, where he stayed for three months. He was about to set sail for Syria when a plot was made against him by the Jews, and so he decided to return through Macedonia. He was accompanied by Sopater son of Pyrrhus from Beroea, by Aristarchus and Secundus from Thessalonica, by Gaius from Derbe, and by Timothy, as well as by Tychicus and Trophimus from Asia. They went ahead and were waiting for us in Troas; but we sailed from Philippi after the days of Unleavened Bread, and in five days we joined them in Troas, where we stayed for seven days. Acts 20:1-6

Sosthenes,_Apollo,_Cephas,_Tychicus,_Epaphroditus,_Cæsar_and_Onesiphorus_of_70_disciples_(Menologion_of_Basil_II)
Sosthenes, Apollo, Cephas, Tychicus, Epaphroditus, Cæsar and Onesiphorus. Menologion of Basil II, 985. Vatican

On the first day of the week, when we met to break bread, Paul was holding a discussion with them; since he intended to leave the next day, he continued speaking until midnight. There were many lamps in the room upstairs where we were meeting. A young man named Eutychus, who was sitting in the window, began to sink off into a deep sleep while Paul talked still longer. Overcome by sleep, he fell to the ground three floors below and was picked up dead. But Paul went down, and bending over him took him in his arms, and said, ‘Do not be alarmed, for his life is in him.’ Then Paul went upstairs, and after he had broken bread and eaten, he continued to converse with them until dawn; then he left. Meanwhile they had taken the boy away alive and were not a little comforted. Acts 20:7-12

Cathédrale_Saint-Étienne_de_Toulouse_-_Saint_Paul_ressuscitant_Eutyque_par_Jacques_François_Courtin_PM31001406
Jacques François Courtin, Saint Paul Revives Eutychus, 1707. Toulouse Cathedral.  Gouv.Fr
DP812361
Taddeo Zuccaro (1529-1566), Saint Paul Restoring Eutychus to Life.
RP-P-OB-6570
Workshop of Philips Galle after Jan van der Straet, 1582.
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